Posts Tagged ‘foot’

I have been having quite a bit of interest in the Hughes & Kettner Tubemeister 36 controller over the last few weeks, so here’s an update on it after using it for a few months.

My advice to anyone looking to build one would simply be this: Don’t. Or if you do, build bigger and less complex.

The main problem with the amp controller I built was that is was simply not big enough. You can’t stomp the channel change very well without accidentally turning on the reverb, cutting out the FX loop, changing to crunch from lead, hitting the killswitch etc you get the idea? And this becomes a real problem live when trying to do mid song channel changes!

The buffer is a good feature, as are the loops, but again these caused me problems. The Tubemeister went down and had to be returned to Germany for a repair, so I bought a 2nd hand Black Heart Little Giant 5w head, which is single channeled. All of a sudden my board was hard to use – I had overdrive in one loop, compressors in the other, what a nightmare to use on the fly!

My Tubemesiter 36 setup is this:

Guitar > Korg Pitchblack (tuner) > TM Footswitch > Loop 1 – Boss CS3 (compressor, modded) – TM Footswitch loop 1 return > TM Footswitch loop 2 – Way Huge Green Rhino > TM Footswitch loop2 return > TM36 > Source Audio EQ > ISP Decimator > EHX Small Stone Nano (phaser) > Malekko 616 (delay) > TM36 return

Which requires 5 (yes 5!) cables running to the amp by the time the channel switching was taken care of!

For using the single channeled amp I ripped up my I had a board setup like this:

Guitar > Korg Pitchblack (tuner) > Boss CS3 (compressor, modded) > Way Huge Green Rhino (overdrive) > Barber Dirty Bomb (distortion) > EHX Small Stone Nano (phaser) > Malekko 616 (delay) > Amp

And this was all I needed. A reverb would have been nice, but for live use not needed. I actually think this is the best sounding setup I have ever used (except for really cranked, heavy stuff where the TM36 lead channel destroyed everything else for me!). And guess what… no FX loop, no channel switching, no on-board reverb, no complex EQ’s, no need for noise gates, no MIDI switching or programming, basically no gimmicks. I actually preferred the Malekko 616 out front to be honest.

So, this has turned into a bit of a ramble and you’re probably wondering how this all relates to the Tubemeister footswitch? Well here it is I’m going to do the dirty and come out and say it: If you think you need anything as complex as the switch I built here and the relevant routing this requires in order to get your rig in line, I would take a step back and consider what you really need before embarking on building something similar. If you have a whole bunch of analogue FX running up front and in the loop that you really need and you find yourself tap dancing to go from your clean and dirty sounds I would seriously suggest looking into getting a digital MIDI enabled solution and to control everything and not building a footswitch like the one I built and rig like this. Something like the Boss GT range,  Line 6’s M13, the TC Nova System (that’s what I’m currently running) or G System etc. Cut out all the tap dancing and get playing! This does add a certain level of complexity when toggling settings on the fly, but it also opens so many possibilities that a traditional footswitch such as the one I built here is rendered archaic.

For the future I’m looking to get one of the bigger single channeled Black Heart amps and the simple board I described for it, and using the TM36 and Nova setup for anything more complex, which for my main band is sometimes required. I gigged this setup last week, and it was awesome:

Guitar > Korg Pitchblack > Boss CS3 > Way Huge Green Rhino > TM36 > Nova System > TM36 return

One button press to go from TM36 lead with a small amount of digital delay to trippy phaser, reverby analogue delayed clean, using the TM36’s channels, compressor and overdrive there for when I need them.

Basically if you want a footswitch for the TM36 my advice is this: you have a midi controlled amp so use it – midi-fy your rig, you won’t look back! I may have bashed MIDI in the past with the TM36 saying it over complicates things – but used right it really is cracking and solves a lot of headaches. Despite being quite old technology MIDI really is the future for us guitarists and I honestly believe digitally controlled analogue circuits with MIDI capabilities are the way pedal building needs to go in order to progress. Full MIDI integration.

If you rig is a super simple amp with no pedals and you want a footswitch to change channels only then that is another story…

Advertisements

Barefoot (LDR Volume) Pedal

Posted: December 8, 2011 in Barefoot, FX
Tags: , , , , , , , , , ,

Barefoot is an idea for a pedal I’m working on, which is a really, really simple concept, and is planned as just a bit of fun. It is a LDR (light dependant resistor) volume pedal, which by the characteristics of the LDR sensor will swell in and out. LDR is by no means a new idea on pedals, Devi Ever uses a LDR on her pedal the Eye Of God/Truly Beautiful Disaster to control feedback in the loop, and many other builders have incorporated them into pedals in some form or another. I remember seeing a schematic for a LDR volume control that had a pot, which controlled a LED, which shone on a LDR changing the output volume. I’m going to just have it in a small window controlling volume on this pedal, so when you cover the sensor the volume will decrease, and when light gets to it will swell back up. The swells are pretty subtle, it isn’t like a Boss Slow Gear or anything like that, but you can defiantly hear them. It isn’t really going to be an exceptionally useful pedal, but it should be fun all the same! In a live situation it could be interesting depending on the lighting, but at the end of the day it is what it is, which is, a bit of a laugh. Plus I had a LDR sensor, enclosure, paint etc all lying around…

I decided on the name Barefoot as it is probably something that will be easier to control in  bare feet (or at least socks!) than it would in whacking great Doc Marts. The artwork is tied into the name Barefoot as the character on the pedal (Kaede Smith) appears in the game Killer 7, where she is referred to throughout by one of the characters as Barefoot. I love the style of the artwork in the game, and Suda51’s philosophy on creating games, so this pedals artwork is in sorts a tribute to that.

Although the pedal has a 9v input it will run passively, the power is just for the LED.